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Archive for the AnyChart charting component

Building a Marimekko Chart with JavaScript

December 22nd, 2020 by Dilhani Withanage

A Marimekko Chart built with JavaScript displayed on a laptop screenWould you like to know how to easily create an interactive Marimekko chart for HTML5 based apps and Web pages using JavaScript? If yes, you are on the best path to learning this.

Also known as Mekko charts and market maps, Marimekko charts display numerical values that vary from 0% to 100% in its Y-axis. The most exciting part lies in their X-axis, which indicates the sum of values within categories. Each category’s width along the X-axis portraits the whole category’s contribution to a total of all data. In simple words, this is a type of a stacked chart that visualizes categorical data. Still, both the Y and X axes vary in a percentage scale by determining each segment’s width and height.

Are you a smartphone enthusiast and interested to look at the global smartphone shipments in 2019 by quarter and by vendor? Then especially follow the present tutorial as we are to visualize this market data in an elegant Marimekko diagram using simple JS chart coding techniques.

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How I Created a Sunburst Chart Using JavaScript to Visualize COVID-19 Data

December 8th, 2020 by Shachee Swadia

A tutorial on how to create a sunburst chart using JavaScript to visualize COVID-19 dataAlmost recovered from COVID-19 myself these days, I decided to explore how the world is currently doing, during the pandemic. So I created a sunburst chart to see at a glance what continents and countries are more (and less) affected by the coronavirus than others. The process was quick and I thought someone could be interested to learn about how such data visualizations can be built in a pretty straightforward way, even with very little technical skills. So I also made a tutorial. And here I am — (1) sharing my interactive sunburst chart of COVID cases and (2) describing how I created it using JavaScript in a matter of minutes, step by step!

My JS sunburst chart provides an overview of the situation as of November 24, 2020, and also shows the global count, continent-wide data, and country-wise proportions for the current active COVID-19 cases and deaths. Scroll down to explore it by yourself and check out the tutorial along the way. Here is a sneak peek of the final chart to get you excited:

JavaScript Sunburst Chart to be created

This sunburst charting tutorial is mainly for beginners to data science. So before we get to business, let’s make sure we’re on the same page. I’ll explain what a sunburst chart is and how it works, to start with. Then I’ll show you how to create a cool and colorful interactive visualization like that with JavaScript (and you can do it even if you don’t know it too well). That’s the plan!

Read the JS charting tutorial »


Mais Hatem Visualizes Reddit Data Using AnyChart JS Charting Library

November 25th, 2020 by AnyChart Team

A Word Cloud chart visualizing Reddit data using the AnyChart JavaScript charting libraryLeading the data visualization market with the best-in-class solutions, we are always excited to see how not only companies but also individuals from all over the world use them to produce interactive charts in their projects. Here’s one new interesting example we’ve recently learned about. Mais Hatem from Syria, currently an undergraduate at the American University of Beirut (Lebanon), created “Cloud a Subreddit,” a web project that generates a beautiful interactive Word Cloud chart out of any given Reddit’s subreddit with the help of the AnyChart JS library.

We had a quick interview with Mais where she told us more about her work and experience using AnyChart. Check it out.

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How to Create a Venn Diagram with JavaScript

November 11th, 2020 by Shachee Swadia

Venn diagram web chart built using JavaScript, on a laptop screenA Venn diagram is a form of data visualization that uses shapes, generally circles, to show the relationships among groups of things. In this chart type, overlapping areas show commonalities while circles that do not overlap show the traits that are not shared.

Introduced by John Venn, an English mathematician, logician, and philosopher, Venn diagrams are also called set diagrams or logic diagrams since they show possible logical relations between elements of different sets. When drawing such charts, we will most probably be dealing with two or three overlapping circles, since having only one circle would be boring, and having four or more circles quickly becomes really complicated.

Not only are these diagrams good visualizations as a concept, but they also provide a great opportunity to represent qualitative data and a bit of graphic humor. Basically, they are easy and fun to build and use. I’ll show you right now!

Read this tutorial to learn how to easily create a visually appealing and informative Venn diagram for your website or app with the help of JavaScript. All the code used and demonstrated along the tutorial will be freely available for you to play with.

During the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, with working from home and avoiding food from outside, many of us have become amateur chefs. So, let us use a JS-based Venn diagram to find out what kind of recipe would be the best to try out on a working day — this is going to be a delightful use case to explore!

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Flippity Uses AnyChart in Word Cloud Visualization Tool

October 26th, 2020 by AnyChart Team

Flippity, a set of free web tools to create flashcards, games, indicators, and more, uses AnyChart in the new, Word Cloud data visualization tool
While thousands of companies choose AnyChart to operate interactive data visualization in commercial projects, we are especially proud our charting solutions have been put for good use in education. Here’s a great new case, for example.

Have you heard about Flippity? It is a fascinating free web project providing teachers (and students) with an extremely straightforward way to turn Google Sheets’ spreadsheets into something cool and useful in the education process — flashcards, quizzes, games, timelines, leaderboards, random name pickers, progress indicators, and many other online things. Earlier this year, Flippity added a dedicated tool to create a Word Cloud from a Google spreadsheet, and we are excited it is powered by our JavaScript charting library!

To learn and tell you more about Flippity and their experience using AnyChart JS for data visualization, we had a quick talk with Steve Fortna, a school teacher from Massachusetts and the creator of Flippity. Check out the interview! (Stack: HTML/Google Sheets.)

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New JavaScript Chart Features in AnyChart 8.9.0

September 29th, 2020 by AnyChart Team

New JavaScript Chart Features in AnyChart 8.9.0AnyChart 8.9.0 is out! The latest major update brings new exciting out-of-the-box features to our award-winning JavaScript charting library product family — AnyChart, AnyStock, AnyGantt, and AnyMap. Enjoy the improved functionality and build even more compelling data visualizations for your web sites and apps in less time!

»»» See What’s New in AnyChart 8.9.0! «««


How to Build Box Plot Using JavaScript: Visualizing World Happiness

September 22nd, 2020 by Wayde Herman

A box plot visualizing world happiness report data, the cover image for a guide on how to build interactive box plots with JavaScript HTML5Data visualization is an important and sometimes undervalued tool in a data scientist’s toolkit. It allows us to gain an understanding and intuition about the data, through exploratory data analysis, which influences preprocessing, feature engineering, and the correct machine learning algorithm choice. It also helps to better evaluate models and even allows you to spot areas in the data where models could have poor performance.

Taking data visualization one step further by adding interactivity is even more advantageous. By adding interactive elements to your visualizations you create a more engaging experience. This in turn makes a user ‘explore’ visualizations instead of just reading them!

In this tutorial, I will be covering how to build an interactive data visualization, specifically a box plot as an example, using JavaScript and a charting library. I will begin by first briefly covering the basics of box plots before going through the steps of building one and then finally using the technique in a fun example to investigate the distribution of happiness between the different regions of the planet in an attempt to answer the question: ‘Where should you live to be happier?’.

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Meet September 2020 Releases of AnyChart and AnyGantt Extensions for Qlik

September 16th, 2020 by AnyChart Team

Meet September 2020 Releases of AnyChart and AnyGantt Extensions for QlikWe’ve just updated the AnyChart and AnyGantt extensions for Qlik Sense to further facilitate the path to enhanced data-driven insights for you! Keep reading to learn about the new amazing Waterfall Chart and Gantt Chart features delivered in the 4.3.249 releases. Then check out the latest versions to see them all in action!

Read more at qlik.anychart.com »


Connecting a MySQL Database to a JS Chart Using PHP

August 4th, 2020 by Wayde Herman

Connecting MySQL Database to JS Chart Using PHPWhen using a charting library like AnyChart, which makes visualizing data so quick and easy, often the most challenging step for beginners is loading data. I think this is largely a result of the fact that while the ways we output the data are quite similar, the input data is commonly very different. The data may differ in many ways including the number of features in the dataset, what type these features may be, the format of the data, and how the data is stored. It is this final issue which we will be addressing today.

There is a lot of coverage in the documentation of using a data object declared within the code as well as importing your data from a file using AnyChart’s data loader. But what about importing the data from an SQL database? This is an easily done but often misunderstood approach to handling and loading data for data visualizations.

Unfortunately, it is not possible to use JavaScript to query a database because JavaScript is a client side solution and querying a database requires a server side approach due to security concerns — you just can’t store database login and password in your JavaScript code. There are many workarounds for this problem including approaches involving PHP, Ajax, Node.js, and many more. Today we will focus on using PHP to handle this task for us when our data is stored in MySQL.

In this tutorial, we will be covering how to query a MySQL database using PHP. We will describe the steps involved and reveal that it is in fact not challenging at all, just different!

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How to Create JavaScript Network Graph

July 22nd, 2020 by Wayde Herman

How to create a Network Graph using JavaScript HTML5 for the webNetwork graphs are a special, very interesting form of data visualization. Unlike more traditional chart types like bar graphs or pie charts, a network graph does a bit more than visualize numerical data. With these charts, you represent each object as a point, referred to as a node, and the connections between the objects as a line, referred to as either a link or an edge. Here, we do not focus on representing objects with the same precision we are typically used to. Instead, we are trying to discover relationships in a network or sections of a network and are less worried about individual nodes.

Right now, I will guide you through how to develop an interactive network graph for the web using JavaScript (HTML5). Inspired by one fun visualization created by Ben Sullins, I decided to take data about the last decade’s biggest TV series, Game of Thrones. It is an epic fantasy tale revolving around the quabbles of various faction-like houses. So in this tutorial, I will be visualizing the relationships in the world of Game of Thrones by showing who attacked whom. Follow me, it’s going to be a cool adventure!

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